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THE HISTORY OF 007 MAGAZINE 1979 – 2004

The 007 MAGAZINE offices 

Since 1979, 007 MAGAZINE and its archive have been housed at a number of business locations. Beginning life as ‘The James Bond British Fan Club’, the organisation in its infancy was created and run by Ross Hendry in Harrow. In 1983 Graham Rye took over the organisation with the assistance of Andrew Pilkington, and its location moved to Addlestone in Surrey. In 1988 Graham Rye made ‘The James Bond 007 International Fan Club & Archive’ his full time professional occupation, moving it into its first commercial office in Woking. The rest, as they say, is history…

1. & 2. 1987 – working in the kitchen of his parents’ bungalow was always a cramped business for both Graham and Andrew in the early days, but necessary due to the huge influx of mail received on a daily basis. 

3. In 1988, 007 MAGAZINE moved into its first commercial premises, renting one unit at The Mayford Centre, on the outskirts of Woking, where it would remain for 24 years. Here for the first time they were able to display many of the James Bond film props in the archive, including Oddjob’s steel-rimmed bowler hat. 

4. & 5. During the first six years in their office many magazines, newspapers and TV programme makers from around the world visited the premises to shoot stills, interviews and other related projects.

6. In the lead up to their 1990 Convention at Pinewood Studios, Graham Rye designs the artwork for the events welcome banner.

7. Graham Rye with his first full-time personal assistant, Jamie Beerman.

8. In 1997 the unit next door to the claustrophobically cramped single office fell vacant, so it was decided to expand, and subsequently a new adjoining doorway was knocked through into the second unit, where Jamie Beerman efficiently looked after the day-to-day nuts and bolts of running the only ever professionally organised James Bond fan-related organisation in the world.

9. Jamie would eventually leave the organisation, unfortunately due to ill-health, but returned in 1998 after a full recovery. In the interim period his position was filled by Carly Jones (below).

10. The 007 MAGAZINE offices became a Mecca for anyone wanting to research their college dissertations; the press; and the many 007 fans who wanted to purchase all kinds of James Bond memorabilia. During this period much of our PR was handled very successfully by Lancelot Narayan (below), who also contributed regularly to 007 MAGAZINE and 007 MAGAZINE Newsletter (long now superseded by the Internet)

GRAHAM RYE at work on the 1990 convention JAMIE BEERMAN with GRAHAM RYE JAMIE BEERMAN CARLY JONES
LANCELOT NARAYAN at work in the 007MAGAZINE offices CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE

10a. During 1994 The JBIFC and 007 MAGAZINE considered moving into offices at Pinewood Studios (above). Unfortunately, the investment offered from a chain of proposed spy themed ‘Spyhouse’ restaurants in the USA was never forthcoming – an enormous disappointment for everyone in our organisation.

11. The legendary and late-lamented Desmond Llewelyn, who played ‘Q’ in 17 James Bond films – spanning an incredible 36 years. Desmond was a good friend and would visit our offices when he could and wonder at “all that bloody stuff!” on the walls. Desmond was to preside over the official opening of our new custom designed office, but sadly it was not to be, as he was tragically killed in a car crash in December 1999.

12. After moving everything by hand from three offices down two flights of stairs over the 1998 Christmas period, it took until November 1999 before the empty 1400 square foot shell was fitted in every nook and cranny with every imaginable item relating to James Bond. It was the nearest to a James Bond museum there has ever been.

13. During her time with 007 MAGAZINE, our MAC Operator Alex-Pow Williams must have scanned more James Bond images than most 100 Bond fans see in their lifetime.

14. The mezzanine floor was used for storage and decorated with prop chemical barrels used in the James Bond film The World Is Not Enough.

15. The area under the mezzanine was ideal for entertaining guests and as a DVD viewing room. Because of its cosy and relaxed atmosphere it was soon affectionately nicknamed ‘the Cubby Hole’.

16. & 17. The 1400 square feet gave ample room to administer to every area of the business, including publishing, photo archive sales, event organisation, and mail-order James Bond collectables.

18. Whenever special guests were entertained at the new office they were photographed in front of our promotionally themed area…

19. …including Shirley Eaton, who surprised Chris ‘Mitch’ Mitchell in our offices with a special presentation from Corgi.

20. Back where he started. “It’s all been a bit like snakes and ladders – unfortunately, for real!” Graham Rye, still in a wall-to-wall office stacked with James Bond paraphernalia. Never say never….

MEZZANINE FLOOR - CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE The 'Cubby Hole' GRAHAM RYE on the mezzanine floor
007 MAGAZINE offices - CLICK FOR LARGER IMAGE GRAHAM RYE in front of the 007 MAGAZINE publicity wall SHIRLEY EATON surprises CHRIS 'MITCH' MITCHELL - CLICK TO READ THE REPORT

007 MAGAZINE #1 (1979)

GRAHAM RYE back ... where it all began!

007 MAGAZINE #55 (2012)

007 MAGAZINE #1 (1979)

007 MAGAZINE #55 (2012)



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