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COLLECTING 007 – UK Records
WRITTEN & COMPILED BY KEVIN HARPER

Popular composer, trumpeter and jazz-band leader John Barry (1933-2011) was brought in by James Bond producers Harry Saltzman and Albert R. Broccoli to orchestrate and record ‘The James Bond Theme’; which was used as the title music, and featured throughout the first James Bond film Dr. No (1962). This track was included on the soundtrack LP album and EP first released in the UK in 1965. Regardless of the controversy surrounding who actually composed ‘The James Bond Theme’, it is always contractually credited to Monty Norman. However, when it came to release a single 45rpm record, John Barry re-recorded the theme with his group ‘The John Barry Seven’, and it was this version that was issued by Columbia Records in September 1962, ahead of the October release Dr. No [listed as ‘Doctor No’ on the label]. The film version of ‘The James Bond Theme’ was recorded on June 21, 1962 at Cine-Tele Sound Studios (CTS) in London. John Barry's own version was recorded on July 23, 1962, once again with ‘The John Barry Seven’ member Vic Flick on guitar. The re-recording runs slightly longer than the film version and has a different orchestration. Spending eleven weeks in the UK chart John Barry's version of ‘The James Bond Theme’ reached number 13 - his most successful single in two years. The re-recording has appeared on several John Barry compilation albums, and will be best-remembered as the first James Bond single.

the James Bond theme - Monty Norman | John Barry | Vic Flick

Many single records released in the UK did not have picture covers, instead they were issued in a plain paper sleeve with a die-cut centre hole. Some record labels used their own generic paper sleeves with the company logo, whereas others were plain white. John Barry also released several other James Bond singles and EPs to tie-in with the release of each subsequent films in the series where he was the composer of the orchestral score. The main title song was also released as a 45rpm single in every case by the recording artistes own label. Listed below are all the UK singles [unless otherwise stated] first released with songs or music from each film in the series. 

UK 45rpm 7" Singles & 7" Extended Play Records 1962-1969

‘The James Bond Theme’ 45rpm single

‘The James Bond Theme’ 45rpm single

‘The James Bond Theme’
The John Barry Seven and Orchestra
Columbia Records DB 4898

Released September 1962. Highest UK chart position #13.
Paper sleeve only in UK
From early 1963 the single had a black label
B-side ‘The Blacksmith Blues’

‘007 - From Russia With Love’ 45rpm single

‘007 - From Russia With Love’ 45rpm single

‘007 - From Russia With Love’
The John Barry Seven and Orchestra
Ember Records
EMB S 181

Released October 1963
A re-recording of John Barry's own composition ‘007’,
with another re-recording of the title track on the B-side.

‘From Russia With Love’ Matt Monro 45rpm single

‘Here And Now’ Matt Monro 45rpm single

‘From Russia With Love’
Matt Monro
Parlophone R 5068

Released 4 October 1963. Highest UK chart position #20.
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘
Here And Now’

‘From Russia With Love’ Matt Monro 45rpm EP

‘From Russia With Love’ Matt Monro 45rpm EP back sleeve

‘From Russia With Love’
Matt Monro
Parlophone Records GEP 8889

Four-track 7" EP. Released 1 November 1963.

‘007 - From Russia With Love’ 4-track EP

‘007 - From Russia With Love’ 4-track EP ZULU

‘007 - From Russia With Love’
The John Barry Seven and Orchestra
Ember Records EMB EP 4551

Four-track 7" EP. Released 1964.
B-side contains two tracks inspired by the original film
soundtrack Zulu composed and conducted by John Barry.

ABOVE: PURE GOLD (left) EMI advertisement from The New Musical Express Friday October 16, 1964 and (top) a Record Mirror advertisement from October 3, 1964. (centre) Composer John Barry and Shirley Bassey with the gold disc awarded to the $1-million selling original soundtrack album for Goldfinger. (bottom) Shirley Bassey with ‘Goldfinger’ co-writers Leslie Bricusse and Anthony Newley.

Recorded at CTS Studios on August 20, 1964 Shirley Bassey's iconic rendition of the title track for Goldfinger was actually performed several times during the sessions. For the Columbia single release an alternate take was used to the one featured on the original soundtrack album. The single version was produced by George Martin, who would later compose the soundtrack for Roger Moore's debut as James Bond in Live And Let Die (1973). Shirley Bassey performed the song at the lavish after-show party at the Astor Hotel following the New York Premiere of Goldfinger on December 21, 1964 which had been held at the DeMille Theatre on Broadway. The single sold over one-million copies in the USA and reached number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. Despite the record-breaking success of the film Goldfinger on its original release, Shirley Bassey's title song only reached number 21 in the UK charts in 1964. The soundtrack album featuring John Barry's orchestral score, which opened with Shirley Bassey's alternate take of the title song heard in the film, was released in the USA on December 12, 1965 reaching number one on March 20, 1965. Although 8-minutes shorter than the UK version, the Goldfinger soundtrack was the most popular album in the US chart for three weeks, and awarded a gold disc signifying over $1-million in sales.

‘Goldfinger’ 45rpm single

‘Strange How Love Can Be’ Goldfinger B-side 45prm single

‘Goldfinger’
Shirley Bassey
Columbia Records DB 7360

Released 18 September 1964. Highest UK chart position #21.
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘
Strange How Love Can Be’

‘Goldfinger’ John Barry 45rpm single

‘Troubadour’ John Barry 45rpm single

‘Goldfinger’
[Jazz instrumental version missing from original UK soundtrack]
John Barry and his Orchestra
United Artists Records UP 1068

Released 2 October 1964
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘
Troubadour’

‘Thunderball’ 45rpm single

‘Key To My Heart’ 45rpm single

‘Thunderball’
Tom Jones
Decca Records F 12292

Released 26 November 1965. Highest UK chart position #35.
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘
Key To My Heart’

‘Casino Royale’ 45rpm single

‘Casino Royale’ 45rpm single B-side

‘Casino Royale’
Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass
A&M Records AMS 700

Released 31 March 1967. Highest UK chart position #27.
B-side ‘
The Wall Street Rag’

‘Have No Fear, Bond Is Here’ Mike Redway 45rpm single

 ‘My Poem For You’ Mike Redway 45rpm single

‘Have No Fear, Bond Is Here’
Mike Redway
Deram Records DM 124
Released 14 April 1967
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘
My Poem For You’
‘The Look of Love’ 45rpm single

‘Give Me Time’ 45rpm single

‘The Look of Love’
Dusty Springfield
Philips Records BF 1577 [B-side]
Released 19 May 1967
Paper sleeve only in UK
A-side ‘Give Me Time’
‘Bond Street’ 45rpm single

‘Alfie’ 45rpm single

‘Bond Street’
Burt Bacharach
A&M Records AMS 702
Released in May 1967, ‘Bond Street’ was a reworking of the track ‘Home James, Don’t Spare The Horses’ featured on the original Casino Royale soundtrack. Paper sleeve only. B-side ‘Alfie’.

‘You Only Live Twice’ 44rpm single

Nancy Sinatra and John Barry ‘You Only Live Twice’ recording Sessions

‘You Only Live Twice’
Nancy Sinatra
Reprise Records RS 20595

Released 9 June 1967. Highest UK chart position #11.
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘Jackson’

ABOVE: The single version of ‘You Only Live Twice’ issued worldwide in 1967 is not the same version which featured on the original soundtrack album. The version heard in the film, and on the soundtrack album, was recorded at CTS Studios on May 2, 1967 with a 60-piece orchestra conducted by composer John Barry. American singer Nancy Sinatra [pictured above at the session with John Barry] was very nervous at the recording, and intimidated by the number of photographers and reporters present at the studio. The album recording was actually made up from around 25 different takes combined by producer John Barry into one seamless vocal track. The single release, produced by Lee Hazlewood and arranged by session guitarist Billy Strange, was less vocally demanding and used backing singers, a rock guitar and double-tracking of Nancy Sinatra's voice. Nevertheless, the Reprise Records single version of ‘You Only Live Twice’ was a big hit in the UK, peaking at number 11, and the highest charting James Bond single to date.
BELOW: John Barry's ‘007’ was also issued by Ember Records in June 1967 and the label stated ‘as featured in the new James Bond film You Only Live Twice’. The version of ‘007’ on the single was identical to the one last released by Ember in 1964. The sleeve also curiously recycled the From Russia With Love artwork used on the 1963/64 singles. The sleeve also acknowledged John Barry's recent 1967 Academy Award© Winner status. Barry's first Oscar was awarded for his score for the 1966 film Born Free. A second single featuring John Barry's instrumental recording of ‘You Only Live Twice’ was released on June 16, 1967 with ‘The Girl With The Sun In Her Hair’ (then enjoying popularity due to its use in a Sunsilk hair shampoo commercial) as its B-side.

‘007’ Ember 45rpm single

‘007’ John Barry Ember Records single 1967

‘007’
John Barry
& and his Orchestra
Ember Records EMB S 243
Released in June 1967, John Barry's ‘007’ was the
same re-recording of the track last issued in 1964.
B-side ‘The Loneliness Of Autumn (Non Sapevo)’
‘You Only Live Twice’ John Barry 45rpm single

‘The Girl With The Sun In Her Hair’ john Barry 45rpm single

‘You Only Live Twice’
John Barry
CBS Records 2825
Released 16 June 1967.
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘The Girl With The Sun In Her Hair’
‘All the Time In The World’ Louis Armtrong 45 rpm single

‘Pretty Little Missy’ Louis Armstrong 45 rpm single

‘All the Time In The World’
Louis Armstrong
United Artists Records UP 35059
Released 21 November 1969
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘Pretty Little Missy’
‘On Her Majesty's Secret Service’ John Barry 45rpm single

‘We Have All the Time In The World’ John Barry 45rpm single

‘On Her Majesty's Secret Service’
John Barry
CBS Records 4680
Released 21 November 1969
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘We Have All the Time In The World’
‘WE HAVE ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD’ 1994 re-release single

‘WE HAVE ALL THE TIME IN THE WORLD’ - Take Two!
In 1994 EMI re-released Louis Armstrong's recording of ‘We Have All The Time In The World’ as a 7" vinyl single (EM 357). The song had been used in a popular Guinness television commercial and the re-released single reached number 3 in the UK chart, whereas the 1969 release did not chart at all. The B-side to the vinyl release was John Barry's main theme to On Her Majesty's Secret Service. The CD edition (CDEM 357) added Louis Armstrong's popular 1967 hit ‘What A Wonderful World’. The re-release also served as a taster for EMI's forthcoming compilation album ‘We Have All The Time In The World - The Pure Genius Of Louis Armstrong’ which featured the majority of Armstrong's vocal hits.

It is ironic that it took a TV commercial to kick-start the renewed interest in the then neglected 1969 James Bond film On Her Majesty's Secret Service, which starred George Lazenby in his only 007 outing. The same year saw George Lazenby appear at ‘The James Bond 007 Fan Club On Her Majesty’s Secret Service Christmas Lunch’, held at Pinewood Studios on December 11th. The event was organised by 007 MAGAZINE Editor & Publisher Graham Rye, and Lazenby's appearance was something of a major coup at the time.

‘Do You Know How Christmas Trees Are Grown?’ Nina 45rpm single

‘The More Things Change’ Nina 45rpm single

‘Do You Know How Christmas Trees Are Grown?’
Nina
CBS Records 4681
Released 28 November 1969
Paper sleeve only in UK
B-side ‘The More Things Change’

PART 2 – 1971-1983


FACT FILES INDEX

 

FACT FILES The James Bond Films